Appeals

Just because a case reaches verdict or settlement does not mean that it has to be over. In most circumstances, judgments and other court decisions in civil and criminal cases can be reviewed in appellate courts. In Connecticut, parties in Superior Court matters have an appeal as a matter of right to the Appellate Court. The actions of administrative boards (including but not limited to Workers Compensation and Motor Vehicles) may be appealed to the Superior Court. Small claims cases are not appealable.

Appeals & Post-Conviction

After the Appellate Court issues a final decision, a party may petition the Connecticut Supreme Court to review that decision. Supreme Court review, however, is discretionary. The state Supreme Court is the final authority on matters of state law. State matters that involve issues of United States Constitutional law may be reviewed by the United States Supreme Court, as that court is the final authority on the federal Constitution. Review by the United States Supreme Court is highly discretionary.

Federal district court decisions are appealed to the United States Court of Appeals. Appeals from the District of Connecticut go to the Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit.

For subsequent proceedings in criminal matters, please see the Post-Conviction Remedies page. In addition to direct appeals, convicted criminal defendants may also seek sentence review and petition for writs of habeas corpus among other remedies. Prisoners also have legal rights.

It is important to note that appellate courts review cases for errors by the lower courts. Although there are rights to appeal, there may not be valid appealable issues in every case.

If you wish to appeal or seek any other post-judgment remedy, please contact me as soon as possible. Many remedies have time requirements. The failure to abide by these time requirements may bar the claim.

While most cases are appealed to the Appellate Court, certain types of case are appealed directly to the state Supreme Court.

Appeals need a careful and strategic approach

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How Appeals Look Court

Even if your case has reached a verdict or settlement, you may still have the right to ask another court to review that decision. In many circumstances, and for many reasons ranging from new facts to new laws to certain errors that occurred during the trial the appellate courts will review lower court decisions in civil and criminal cases. The process and procedure for bringing an appeal are complex and an appeal is not automatic in most cases.

Knowing when and if you have the opportunity to appeal, and knowing whether you should appeal a decision, requires the assistance of an experienced attorney. I will assess the reality of your case and evaluate the existing record as well as the governing law in order to give you an honest assessment of your appeal.  Essential to evaluating the decision to appeal is communicating to you the costs in time and money as compared to the likelihood of success. I have successfully appealed criminal and civil cases to the Connecticut Appellate Court, Connecticut Supreme Court, and United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit.

State Court Appeals

In Connecticut, parties in Superior Court matters have an appeal as a matter of right to the Appellate Court. While most cases are appealed to the Appellate Court, certain types of case are appealed directly to the Connecticut Supreme Court.

Judgments and decisions of the Probate Court may be appealed to the Superior Court wherein the probate court sits. The actions of administrative boards (including but not limited to Workers Compensation and Motor Vehicles) may be appealed to the Superior Court. Small claims cases, however, may not be appealed.

Once the Appellate Court issues a final decision, a party may petition the Connecticut Supreme Court to review that decision. Supreme Court review is discretionary. The Connecticut Supreme Court is the final authority on matters of state law. State matters that involve issues of United States Constitutional law may be reviewed by the United States Supreme Court, as that court is the final authority on the federal Constitution. Review by the United States Supreme Court, however, is highly discretionary.

Time To Appeal

If you think you might want to appeal a decision, I am very accessible and can talk weekends and nights if needed. It is very important that you consult an attorney as soon as possible after the final decision. Appeals to the Connecticut Appellate Court must generally be filed within 20 days after the final judgment or order. For a probate appeal, the time limit is 30 days. The record created in the lower court should preserve the right to appeal. If bases for an appeal have not been preserved, or if too much time has passed, sometimes a case cannot be appealed. Only an attorney informed by the records, the facts, the law, and the procedure can provide you with insight regarding your appeal rights.

Federal Court Appeals

A party may appeal federal district court decisions to United States Circuit Courts, and in Connecticut, by the Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit considers appeals from the District Court of Connecticut. Federal courts have many rules governing the appellate process, and these rules differ from the rules governing appeals of state court decisions. If you wish to appeal or seek any other post-judgment remedy, please contact me as soon as possible. The earlier you come for a visit, the more options you likely have in your case.

For subsequent proceedings in criminal matters, please see my Post-Conviction Remedies page. In addition to direct appeals, convicted criminal defendants may also seek sentence review and petition for writs of habeas corpus among other remedies. Prisoners also have legal rights, and I am there for these clients and will visit them in prison and represent them in court.

Appellate Law Attorney in Connecticut

The appellate law in Connecticut is not only complex but also extremely time sensitive. Attorney Chris DeMatteo has extensive experience pursuing appeals on behalf of clients in state and federal courts. If you think you might want to appeal, don’t delay because missing deadlines could bar your appeal. Contact Chris for a free consultation.