Connecticut's Clean Slate Law Will Erase Certain Criminal Convictions

Gov. Lamont signed into law Senate Bill 1019, which has become Public Act 21-32. The new law, which is in the same vein as previous Gov. Malloy's criminal justice reform, makes some changes to the pardon and parole process, but most significantly creates an automatic erasure provision for certain criminal convictions. Previously, the only ways to have a criminal conviction expunged or erased was through a pardon (to the Board of Pardons and Paroles) or an erasure petition (to the Superior Court). I've done both for clients.

The new legislation creates an automatic process for certain convictions to be erased after a certain period of time. The following convictions are eligible for automatic erasure starting on Jan. 1, 2023:

  • Misdemeanors, seven years after a person's last conviction, if committed in 2000 or later;
  • D or E felonies (punishable by not more than five years in prison), ten years after a person's last conviction, if committed in 2000 or later.
  • Eligible offenses committed before 2000 may be erased through the filing of a form through the Superior Court

Exceptions - the following types of convictions are not eligible for automatic erasure

  • Domestic violence offenses (even misdemeanors)
  • Sex crimes (even misdemeanors; regardless of violence)
  • Class A, B and C felonies and unclassified felonies that carry punishments greater than five years of prison

Pardons

The pardon process will still exist. Individuals with offenses ineligible for the new erasure law can still apply for pardons or utilize the existing erasure process for decriminalized offenses (if applicable). 

If you have a criminal conviction in Connecticut and are interested in having it erased or expunged, please contact me by phone or email and I will tell you what your options are and how we can utilize them. 

 


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